Cheesy Sourdough Plait

Enriched sourdough bread, plaited and covered in meted cheddar cheese.

DSC04955

This is probably the best bread I’ve made so far with my sourdough ferment. We managed to eat half the loaf between two people all in one evening!

Enriching the dough with the milk and egg made it really light and tasty, and robust enough to be eaten just on its own, fresh out of the oven.

Variations: you could use any cheese you want to cover the bread, or even mix some sun-dried tomatoes or herbs into the dough, to make it extra exciting!

DSC04953

Ingredients: Makes one large loaf

  • 200g Sourdough Ferment
  • 500g Strong White Bread Flour
  • 10g Salt
  • 25g Honey
  • 250ml Milk
  • 1 Egg
  • Cheddar Cheese, grated

DSC04954

To Make:

Combine the ferment, flour, salt, honey, milk and egg in a large bowl, and mix to form a rough dough. Turn out onto a work surface and knead for 10 minutes, until smooth and elastic. Return to the bowl and prove for 8 hours.

Turn out the proved dough, and knock out the air. Stretch out into a rectangle and cut 6-7 strips lengthways, then plait the strips to the end, to form a plaited loaf. Transfer to an oiled baking tray and leave to prove for a further eight hours.

IMAG0367

IMAG0368

IMAG0369

Preheat the oven to 200°C

Cover the plait in grated cheddar cheese and bake in the preheated oven for 30-40 minutes, until golden brown, and the loaf sounds hollow when tapped.

Leave to cool on a wire rack before serving.

DSC04957

Blueberry Cheesecake Sourdough Rolls

Enriched sourdough bread, covered with cream cheese and blueberries, rolled into swirls and drizzled with sweet lemon icing.

thumb_DSC05103_1024

I wanted to use my sourdough to make some sweet breakfast rolls this weekend, my first thought was cinnamon rolls, but I decided to be a bit more adventurous, so I used cream cheese and blueberry as a filling instead. Plus, I thought cinnamon rolls were a bit wintery to be made with this lovely spring time weather!

thumb_DSC05086_1024

I’m really glad I used my ferment because the sourdough flavour gives the rolls a much more robust finish than a normal sweet dough, which complements the blueberries and cream cheese really well.

BUT, you don’t need a ferment to enjoy this recipe, if you don’t have one, just replace the ferment in the recipe with 15g of fast action yeast, and only prove for 1-2 hours each time. I’m sure it would still be delicious!

This was really exciting and different, and I’m really pleased that I’ve found such fun things to do with my ferment! You should look forward to many more sourdough posts!

thumb_DSC05094_1024

Variations: You could use any fruit in the rolls, some strawberries or raspberries would be really nice, and you could add some chunks of white and dark chocolate, to make them even sweeter.

thumb_DSC05091_1024

Ingredients: Makes one large loaf

The Dough:

  • 200g Sourdough Ferment
  • 500g Strong White Bread Flour
  • 10g Salt
  • 50g Honey
  • 250ml Milk
  • 1 Egg

The Filling:

  • 250g Cream Cheese
  • 1 Egg
  • 100g Sugar
  • 50g Self Raising Flour
  • 200g Fresh Blueberries

thumb_DSC05092_1024

To Make:

Combine the ferment, flour, salt, honey, milk and egg in a large bowl, and mix to form a rough dough. Turn out onto a work surface and knead for 10 minutes, until smooth and elastic. Return to the bowl and prove for 8 hours.

Turn out the proved dough, and knock out the air and stretch into a large rectangle.

thumb_IMAG0410_1024

Combine all the filling ingredients except the cinnamon and blueberries, and spread the mixture over the rectangle, making sure it is evenly covered right up to the edges.

thumb_IMAG0412_1024

Sprinkle over the cinnamon, then scatter over the fresh blueberries. Roll up the dough, to form a long sausage shape, and slice into 12-14 pieces, lay out onto a baking tray and leave to prove for 2 hours.

thumb_IMAG0413_1024

Preheat the oven to 180C, and bake the rolls in the oven for 20-25 minutes, until puffed up and golden brown.

Leave to cool a little on a wire rack and serve warm.

thumb_DSC05099_1024

Olive and Feta Sourdough Loaf

Chewy, crusty sourdough, studded with pieces of salty feta cheese, bitter green olives and fragrant fresh oregano.

DSC04867

This is the second variation of my sourdough, Ive used a slightly different recipe to the basic sourdough, as I have added olive oil and used all strong white bread flour, to give a texture that is a bit more like ciabatta.

I have flavoured the bread with chunks of feta cheese, green olives and fresh oregano, to give a Mediterranean feel.

I took this home over easter weekend and everyone enjoyed it, delicious dipped in olive oil and balsamic vinegar, or as a side to a main meal. So definitely a successful recipe, and it tasted very different to the original sourdough!

DSC04862

Variations: You could swap the olives for sun-dried tomatoes and the feta for any other hard cheese of your choice.

Ingredients: Makes Two Loaves

  • 500g Sourdough Ferment
  • 650g Self Raising Flour
  • 300ml Water
  • 20g Salt
  • 50ml Olive Oil
  • 4 tbsp Chopped Green Olives
  • 1 Bunch of Oregano
  • 200g Feta Cheese

DSC04871

To Make:

Combine the ferment, flour salt and water in a large bowl and mix to a rough dough.

Knead for 10 minutes, until smooth and elastic. Return to the bowl and leave to prove for 4 hours.

Roll out the dough and press in the olives certainly and oregano, fold into a ball and knead until evenly distributed.

IMAG0302

IMAG0303

Split into two and form each half into a ball, return to bowls coated with semolina, leave to rest for 12-16 hours.

Preheat the oven to 200°C and grease two baking trays.

Turned out onto greased baking trays, and bake in the preheated oven for 40-50 minutes, until evenly browned, and sound hollow when tapped underneath.

Leave to cool, and serve in thick slices.

DSC04868

Seedy Sourdough Loaf

Crunchy, chewy sourdough loaf, studded with mixed seeds. 

DSC04815

This is the first variation recipe I have done with my sourdough ferment. Last time I had a ferment, I used the same basic recipe every time I made the bread, which got a bit boring! So this time I’ve decided to experiment with diffferent fillings and shapes, to see how many exciting breads I can make from my ferment.

Here, I have used the same basic recipe as in my first sourdough post, but I’ve used a loaf tin to shape the bread, and I’ve added some nuts and seeds, to give some extra flavour.

This made a lovely robust bread with lots and lots of flavour, much more exciting than a normal sandwich loaf! It tasted delicious with a bowl of soup at lunchtime.

DSC04812

Ingredients: Makes 1 Loaf

  • 200g Sourdough Ferment
  • 400g Strong White Bread flour
  • 75g Wholemeal Flour
  • 10g Salt
  • 300g Water
  • 200g Mixed Nuts and Seeds

DSC04817

To Make:

Combine all ingredients for the sourdough in a large bowl (except the seeds), until well combined and the mixture begins to form a ball of sticky dough.

Turn out onto a work surface and knead for 10 minutes until smooth and elastic. Form into a tight ball, and return to a well floured bowl. Cover and leave to prove for around 4-6 hours, until bubbles appear at the top of the dough.

Turn out the proved dough and knead in the mixed seeds. Form into a rectangle by flattening the dough and then folding it into the middle. Coat in flour and transfer to a greased loaf tin, leave to rest for 16-18 hours.

Preheat the oven to 200°C

Slash the top of the bread in a criss-cross pattern and bake in the preheated oven for 40-45 minutes, until evenly browned, and sounds hollow when tapped. Leave to cool on a wire rack.

Slice and serve! Delicious with a hot bowl of soup.

DSC04814

Sourdough – Ferment & Bread Recipe!

Recipe for your own unique sourdough ferment, so you can make delicious, rustic, crunchy sourdough loaves at home!

I got Richard Bertinet’s recipe book: Crust, for Christmas a few years ago, which includes a recipe for making your own sourdough ferment and bread. I made my own ferment over Christmas, and was regularly baking sourdough loaves for about six months, until I forgot to feed it, and my ferment died!

DSC04806

A few weeks ago, I decided that I really wanted to be able to make my own sourdough again, so I have made a new ferment and used it for a few different loaves now. This post gives Richard Bertinet’s recipe for the ferment and a basic sourdough loaf.

Hopefully I will keep my ferment alive for longer this time! It generally needs refreshing every 2-3 days, but reading his recipe through again, he does suggest that adding double the amount of flour and the same amount of water, to the all ferment you have in the fridge ( rather than only keeping 200g), if you are going away for a few weeks.

DSC04807

Ingredients:

To Make the Ferment:

  • 1kg Strong White Bread Flour (for all the stages)
  • 200g Wholemeal/Spelt Flour
  • 1tbsp Honey

The Sourdough:

  • 400g Ferment
  • 850g Strong White Bread Flour
  • 100g Wholemeal Flour
  • 600g water
  • 20g Salt

DSC04804

To Make:

The Ferment:

Mix together 50g wholemeal flour, 150g strong white bread flour, 25g honey and 150g of warm water in a large bowl. Cover with cling film and leave in a warm place (as close to 30°C as possible – I put mine in an airing cupboard), for 48 hours, until the dough has become loose, bubbly and darkened in colour.

IMAG0275

IMAG0281

Then add 300g of strong white bread flour to your fermented mixture, with 150g of warm water, mix well, and cover with the same piece of cling film. Leave in a warm place for a further 24 hours, until loose and bubbly again.

IMAG0282

IMAG0289

Take 200g of your ferment and  mix it with 400g of strong white bread flour and 150g of warm water. Store in a warm place for a further 12-16 hours, and then transfer to the fridge for 2 days, to slow the fermentation.

IMAG0290

The sourdough ferment is now ready to use!

Refreshing your ferment:

Add 400g of flour and 200g of water to 200g of ferment. Leave in the fridge for 2-3 days, by which time it will either be ready to use, or you will need to refresh it again.

Sourdough Recipe:

Combine all ingredients for the sourdough in a large bowl, until well combined and the mixture begins to form a ball of sticky dough.

IMAG0291 (1)

Turn out onto a work surface and knead for 10 minutes until smooth and elastic. Form into a tight ball, and return to a well floured bowl. Cover and leave to prove for around 4-6 hours, until bubbles appear at the top of the dough.

IMAG0292 (1)

Turn out the proved dough and divide into two. Form each piece into a ball and coat in flour, place either in wicker proving baskets or return to well foured bowls, and leave to rest for 16-18 hours.

Preheat the oven to 200°C and grease two baking trays. Place a tray of water in the bottom of the oven.

Tip out onto the greased baking trays and slash the top of the bread in a criss-cross pattern. Bake in the preheated oven for 40-45 minutes, until evenly browned, and they sound hollow when tapped. Leave to cool on a wire rack.

IMAG0293

IMAG0295

Cut into thin slices and serve. Tastes fantastic when dipped in olive oil and balsamic vinegar, or topped with cheese and Chutney!

DSC04809

DSC04822