Spiced Orange Jam

Sweet and Sour Orange Jam Spiced with Aromatic Star Anise, Cinnamon, Stem Ginger and Vanilla.

Even after making three jars of Seville orange curd, I still had around 300ml of Seville orange juice and zest stored in the freezer waiting to be used. When I came across some cheap clementines in the supermarket, I decided to use them, with the frozen juice to make an orange jam.

The very wintery weather wave been having recently inspired me to make a (slightly out of season!) christmassy jam, with mulling spices and warming ginger. It tastes wonderful just on toast but I will be posting a cake to use some jam up later this week!

Variations: You could use apple juice and fruit instead of orange for a mulled Apple jam.

DSC04107

Ingredients: Makes Three 250g Jars

  • 300ml Seville Orange Juice
  • Zest from 3 Seville Oranges
  • 5 Medium/Large Clementines or Tangerines, Peeled and Chopped
  • 2 Star Anise
  • 1 Cinnamon Stick
  • 4 Pieces of Stem Ginger, Finely Chopped
  • 50ml Stem Ginger Syrup
  • 400g Jam Sugar
  • A Splash of Spiced Rum
  • 1tsp Vanilla Essence

Put the orange juice zest and chopped fruit into a pan with all the spices and bring to the boil on a high heat.

Cool a small plate in the fridge.

Add the spiced rum and then the stem ginger and syrup.

Stir in the jam sugar and turn the heat down.

Simmer the mixture until it has reduced in volume by about 1/3. This should take 30 minutes to an hour.

Once the mixture has thickened and reduced, check that the jam has set by spooning a small amount onto the cooled plate. If the mixture does not drip when tipped up, the jam is ready. If not you may need to add more Jam sugar or reduce the volume of the mixture further.

Stir in the vanilla extract.

Pour the jam into three sterilised 250g jars and seal tightly. Leave to cool and then sore in the cupboard, or in the fridge once open.

Advertisements

Seville Orange Curd

DSC04086

When I came across an abundance of reduced Seville oranges at the supermarket last week, I couldnโ€™t resist buying them with the intention of making a Seville Orange marmalade. However I soon remembered that I donโ€™t actually like marmalade, so after scouring Pinterest for some alternative recipes I settled on the idea of making an orange curd. I couldnโ€™t find a particular recipe that worked with the type of oranges I had, so I amalgamated a few recipes together and the curd turned out beautifully.

The Seville oranges give it a very citrusy and slightly bitter taste, so if you prefer things a bit sweeter, you can taste the curd whilst it is cooking and add more sugar if you think it needs it!

Variations:

Add some thyme leaves at the end of cooking to make an orange and thyme curd, or 1tsp of ground cardamom for a more aromatic finish.

Ingredients: Makes Three 220g Jars

  • 6 Egg Yolks
  • 300ml Freshly Squeezed Orange Juice
  • Zest from 3 Oranges
  • 250g Caster Sugar
  • 2tsp Corn flour
  • 120g Butter

Combine the egg yolks, orange juice, zest and sugar in a large heatproof bowl, over a pan of simmering water.

Continue heating the mixture, stirring constantly for around 20 minutes.

Mix the cornflower with 1tsp of water and add to the curd mixture

Cook for a further 5 minutes

Check that the curd is ready by spooning a small amount on a cold plate, if the mixture doesnโ€™t drip when the plate is tipped up the curd is ready, if not, then continue heating and stirring for a little longer. You can also tell that it is ready when it starts setting at the edges of the bowl.

Stir in the butter until it has completely melted and combined with the curd

Pour the curd into sterilised jars, seal and leave to cool. Donโ€™t worry if the curd is has not set at this point, it will still be quite runny! Store the curd in the fridge, where it will solidify into a more recognisable curd-like consistency.

The curd will keep in the fridge for around 2 weeks.